"Joslin Medal recipients are individuals who have beaten the odds against diabetes, and Robert Bates is certainly no exception," says George L. King, M.D., director of research at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "Robert has continued to live a very successful and fulfilling life despite the challenges associated with the disease."

Bates is a retired chief train dispatcher for the Metro North Railroad in New York. "I am grateful to receive the medal and feel a certain amount of pride in the fact that I have beaten the odds. At the time I was diagnosed, life expectancy was not favourable," says Bates. "I am appreciative that I received early training and education at Joslin Clinic and have benefited from ongoing advances in diabetes treatment, which have allowed me to live a full life." Bates was treated since he was diagnosed in 1931 and regularly inquired about his health. By living more than 75 years with type 1 diabetes, "it shows that Joslin's mission was not in vain, and that my years of testing my blood glucose levels, doing calculations to balance insulin with food intake, and the many, many injections, have paid off," Bates says.

Bates continues to participate in clinical research at Joslin to help others with diabetes. In March, he came to Joslin to participate in the Medalist Study, which began in April 2005 and is led by King and Hillary Keenan, Ph.D. The Medalist Study is examining people living more than 50 years with type 1 diabetes to understand what factors contribute to the longevity among individuals who have received this honour.

MEDICA.de; Source: Joslin Diabetes Center