Women with partners aged 35 or older had nearly three times as many miscarriages as women conceiving with men younger than 25 years of age. This finding is independent of the woman's age and not explained by other factors such as diabetes, smoking, or previous spontaneous abortions, and adds to the growing realization of the importance of paternal characteristics for successful reproductive outcome.

Up to now there has been a vast amount of research on women and how their characteristics affect pregnancy. “Scientists seem to have forgotten that men are equal partners in reproduction, and their influence should be studied to the same degree. Our group has focused on men's influence on the health of their offspring, and we have made some fascinating discoveries," said Karine Kleinhaus, MD, MPH currently in Columbia's Department of Psychiatry. "This study shows how a man's age affects the likelihood of miscarriage."

The international team of scientists involved in the study used a large historical data set containing information on many characteristics of mothers and fathers that might contribute to spontaneous abortion. The researchers analysed data from the ante-natal or post-partum interviews of 13,865 women. This data was recorded in the Jerusalem Perinatal Study, a population-based cohort derived from 92,408 births in Jerusalem in 1964-1976.

The data of this study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the New York Psychiatric Institute was not only numerous but also very extensive. This enabled the researchers to include variables such as maternal diabetes, parity, history of prior spontaneous and induced abortions, and history of maternal smoking, and socioeconomic status.

MEDICA.de; Source: Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health