Less Hospitalisation of Children

This is shown by the latest numbers from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. In 2006, there were 335,000 hospital stays for children with asthma. In 137,000 cases, the children were admitted specifically to treat asthma. In the remaining 197,000 cases the children had asthma but were being treated for another illness which is often directly related to asthma (for instance, pneumonia or bronchitis).

AHRQ also found that children from poorer communities, where the average income was less than 37,000 US-Dollars a year, were 76 percent more likely to be admitted than those from wealthier communities, where the average income was greater than 37,000 US-Dollars a year (2.7 admissions per 1,000 children versus 1.5 admissions per 1,000 children, respectively). Poor children with asthma as a co-existing illness were 54 percent more likely to be hospitalised than children from wealthier communities (3.5 admissions per 1,000 children versus 2.3 admissions per 1,000 children, respectively).

Infants under one year of age were four times more likely to be hospitalised for asthma than children ages 15 to 17 (5.1 admissions per 1,000 children compared with 1.8 admissions per 1,000 children). And roughly 27 percent of all children admitted for pneumonia also had asthma, as did nine percent of those hospitalised for acute bronchitis; and five percent for depression or bipolar disease.

These numbers are based on data from HCUP Statistical Brief #58: Hospital Stays Related to Asthma for Children, 2006. The report uses statistics from the 2006 Kids’ Inpatient Database, a database of hospital inpatient stays of children that is nationally representative of pediatric inpatient stays in all short-term, non-Federal hospitals. The data in the KID are for all children, regardless of their type of insurance type or whether they were insured.

MEDICA.de; Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)