Invention to Prevent Surgical Adhesions

Cohn has developed a unique polymer (compounds of high molecular weight) that generate a physical barrier between layers of injured tissues, preventing the formation of adhesions between opposing tissue planes.

Adhesions are abnormal bands of scar tissue that form post-operatively in the treated area and cause organs to bind to one another. Typically, adhesions persist long after the original trauma has healed, attaching organs, nerves, muscles and other neighboring structures. They are formed in approximately 85 percent of all patients undergoing routine surgical procedures and represent a major source of post-operative complications and deaths.

The generation of adhesions following heart surgery is of special concern, since they may affect cardiac function. Furthermore, in the frequent cases where repeat operations are required, adhesions obscure cardiac landmarks, making the procedure potentially life-threatening to the patient due to inadvertent vascular or cardiac injury.

The significant step forward represented by Cohn’s invention lies in the development of a new family of biodegradable copolymers, which are combinations of two different monomers (low molecular weight molecules). These copolymers combine two types of segments, each of them rendering the polymers with specific properties.

This multicomponent approach permits the variance of various parameters of the materials -- adjusting their basic chemistry, composition and molecular weight - to comply with the clinical requirements of each specific surgical application.

MEDICA.de; Source: Hebrew University of Jerusalem