How We Can Follow Objects

When an object moves, we follow it with our eyes: our brain correspondingly calculates the speed of the object and adapts our eye movement to it. The control of eye movement responds more sensitively to changes in the speed of fast moving objects than slow moving objects. "Gain control" is the name for this phenomenon.

It is known that different regions of the cerebral cortex are involved in eye tracking movements. These include "Area MST" and the so-called frontal eye fields (FEFs). The aim now was to amalgamate such insights into a computer model that actually explains this eye movement control. The new model simulates the most important circuits required for controlling eye tracking movement. In Area MST, the speed of the target object is calculated and compared with the momentary eye speed in order to adapt it accordingly. The FEFs are the actual location where the gain control takes place; this is where the sensitivity of eye movement to changes in speed is defined.


In order to verify their models in studies, the scientists had subjects follow a dot on a screen with their eyes. The activity of the FEFs was briefly disrupted by so-called "transcranial magnetic stimulation". This technology can influence individual, targeted areas of the brain for a few seconds. The experiments did confirm the predictions of the models: as long as the observed object was moving at a constant speed, a disruption of the FEFs had little effect on eye movement control.

The sensitivity of the eye movement to changes in speed, on the other hand, did not increase sufficiently at higher speeds when the FEFs were disrupted. It follows that the gain control is determined in the FEFs depending on the speed of the eye or the target. In short, the faster an object moves, the greater the adaptability.

MEDICA.de; Source: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) München