Heated Chemotherapy Drugs Improve Surgery Outcomes

A combination with better results
© Picture Disk

"Patients with peritoneal cancer that has spread from the small bowel represent both a unique diagnostic and treatment challenge," said Perry Shen, M.D., assistant professor of surgical oncology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and lead author of one of four new studies.

The technique is also useful for tumours that have spread from the colon, rectum, stomach as well as well as mesothelioma of the abdominal cavity. The new studies show that the combination of surgery and IPHC improves overall survival and quality of life in these selected patients.

The patients in this study had a mean survival of 45.1 months, compared to 3.1 months for patients who received only traditional treatment. "While further study is needed on the effects of surgery and IPHC with other treatments," said Shen, "the data from this study suggest that this combination seems to be an effective and attractive option in a very difficult situation."

In a study of patients with tumours in the abdominal cavity which have spread from tumours of the appendix, data from John Stewart, M.D., instructor in surgery, show that long-term survival is anticipated in the majority of patients with low grade tumours who are treated with surgery and IPHC. High grade lesions result in significantly lower survival rates even with this treatment.

A study of patients with advanced ovarian cancer also showed that it is responsive to a combination of surgery and IPHC. "Surgery combined with IPHC seems to be a life extending and enhancing treatment option for patients with some of the most difficult cancers," said Edward Levine, MD, professor and head of surgical oncology at Wake Forest Baptist.

MEDICA.de; Source: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

"Patients with peritoneal cancer that has spread from the small bowel represent both a unique diagnostic and treatment challenge," said Perry Shen, M.D., assistant professor of surgical oncology at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and lead author of one of four new studies.

The technique is also useful for tumours that have spread from the colon, rectum, stomach as well as well as mesothelioma of the abdominal cavity. The new studies show that the combination of surgery and IPHC improves overall survival and quality of life in these selected patients.

The patients in this study had a mean survival of 45.1 months, compared to 3.1 months for patients who received only traditional treatment. "While further study is needed on the effects of surgery and IPHC with other treatments," said Shen, "the data from this study suggest that this combination seems to be an effective and attractive option in a very difficult situation."

In a study of patients with tumours in the abdominal cavity which have spread from tumours of the appendix, data from John Stewart, M.D., instructor in surgery, show that long-term survival is anticipated in the majority of patients with low grade tumours who are treated with surgery and IPHC. High grade lesions result in significantly lower survival rates even with this treatment.

A study of patients with advanced ovarian cancer also showed that it is responsive to a combination of surgery and IPHC. "Surgery combined with IPHC seems to be a life extending and enhancing treatment option for patients with some of the most difficult cancers," said Edward Levine, MD, professor and head of surgical oncology at Wake Forest Baptist.

MEDICA.de; Source: Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center