Half the US population Is Sensitive to Allergens

Land of the free - and allergic
persons: 54.3% of all US citizens
belong to this group; © ABDA

The new findings, based on data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), shows that 54.3% of individuals aged 6-59 years old had a positive skin test response to at least one of the ten allergens tested.

The highest prevalence rates were for dust mite, rye, ragweed, and cockroach, with about 25% of the population testing positive to each allergen. Peanut allergy was the least common, with 9% of the population reacting positively to that food allergen.

A positive skin test result may mean the individual is more vulnerable to asthma, hay fever, and eczema. "Asthma is one of the world's most significant chronic health conditions," said David A. Schwartz, MD, director National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). "Understanding what may account for the rising worldwide asthma rates will allow us to develop more effective prevention and treatment approaches."

NHANES III is a nationally representative survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention between 1988-1994 to determine the health and nutritional status of the U.S. population. Approximately 10,500 individuals participated in the skin testing. During these tests, skin was exposed to allergens and a positive test was determined by the size of the reaction on the skin. The ten allergens tested include: Dust mite, German cockroach, cat, perennial rye, short ragweed, Bermuda grass, Russian thistle, White oak, Alternia alternata, and peanuts.

Researchers also compared skin test responses between NHANES III and the previous survey, NHANES II, conducted from 1976-1980. The prevalence of a positive skin test response was much higher in NHANES III than in NHANES II.

The prevalence of asthma increased 73.9% from 1980 to 1996. However, Dr. Arbes was quick to point out that differences in skin test procedures between the two surveys prevent the authors from definitively concluding that the prevalence of skin test positivity has increased in the U.S. population.

MEDICA.de; Source: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences