Diabetes And Depression Linked

Photo: Pregnant woman looking at her belly

Diabetes seems to influence
the psychological state of the
mother-to-be; © SXC

Depression during the perinatal period (often considered as the last several months of pregnancy and the year following childbirth) affects at least ten percent to twelve percent of new mothers, and approximately two percent to nine percent of pregnancies are complicated by diabetes, according to background information in the article. Prior studies have established an association between diabetes and depressive disorders in general adult populations.

Katy Backes Kozhimannil, M.P.A., of Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Boston, and colleagues examined the association between diabetes and depression in the perinatal period among low-income women. The researchers used data from New Jersey’s Medicaid administrative claims database, and included 11,024 women who gave birth between July 2004 and September 2006, and who were continuously enrolled in Medicaid for six months prior to delivery and one year after giving birth.

The researchers found that women with any form of diabetes were significantly more likely to experience some indication of depression during pregnancy or postpartum. After controlling for the effects of age, race, year of delivery, and preterm birth, women with diabetes had nearly double the odds of having a depression diagnosis or taking an antidepressant medication during the perinatal period (15.2 percent) compared with those who had no indication of diabetes (8.5 percent). This association remained consistent across the various types of diabetes.

Among women with no indication of depression during pregnancy, those with diabetes had higher odds of experiencing new onset depression during the postpartum period (9.6 percent) compared with those without diabetes (5.9 percent).

“Pregnancy and the postpartum period represent a time of increased vulnerability to depression. Treatable, perinatal depression is underdiagnosed, and it is important to target detection and support efforts toward women at high risk,” the authors write.

MEDICA.de; Source: American Medical Association (AMA)