Chiropractic Cost-Effective in Treating Back Pain

Putting the vertebrae back into place
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The new study is one of the first to compare low-back treatment costs and outcomes within the structure of the American health care system. 2780 patients were involved with mechanical low-back pain who referred themselves to 60 doctors of chiropractic and 111 medical doctors in 64 general practice community clinics.

Chiropractic care included spinal manipulation, physical therapies, an exercise plan, and self-care patient education. Medical care consisted of prescription drugs, an exercise plan, self-care advice, and a referral to a physical therapist (in approximately 25 percent of cases). The costs of treatment and patients' pain, disability, and satisfaction with their health care were assessed at three and twelve months after the initial visit to the doctor.

The office costs alone for chiropractic treatment of low-back pain were higher than for medical care. However, when costs of advanced imaging and referral to physical therapists and other providers were added, chiropractic care costs for chronic patients were 16 percent lower than medical care costs. The differences between medical and chiropractic total costs were not statistically significant for acute or chronic patients. The study did not include over-the-counter drug, hospitalisation, or surgical costs.

Both acute and chronic patients showed better outcomes in pain and disability reduction and higher satisfaction with their care after undergoing chiropractic treatment. The advantage of chiropractic care was clinically significant in the chronic patient group at three months' follow-up, but smaller in the acute group. Improvements in patients' physical and mental health were comparable in both the chiropractic and the medical group, with the exception of physical health scores in the acute patients in the chiropractic group, which showed an advantage over the medical group.

MEDICA.de; Source: American Chiropractic Association