Bioengineer Wins Early Career Award

The Wallace H. Coulter Foundation who grants the award judged Zhang’s research on an injectable hydrogel-based system for the treatment of stroke to be a highly promising technology that can progress towards commercial development and clinical practice. Zhang proposed the injectable hydrogel system to assist stem cell therapy for stroke treatment.

Zhang’s research on neurobioengineering has also been recognised by the 2007 Department of Defense Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder/Traumatic Brain Injury Research Program of the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) with a Concept Award on “Brain Tissue Regeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury”.

The Early Career Translational Research Awards support biomedical engineering research that is translational in nature and encourage and assist eligible biomedical engineering investigators as they establish themselves in academic research careers with two years of funding.

The Wallace H. Coulter Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation in Miami dedicated to improving human healthcare by supporting translational research in biomedical engineering. Recipients of the Early Career Translational Research Awards are full-time, tenure-track faculty members with a primary appointment in biomedical engineering. They have received their doctoral degree no more than six years prior to their application, and they held a rank no higher than assistant professor at the time of application.; Source: Clemson University