MEDICA Newsletter

Don't miss any news:
Register for our newsletter and all news from will be delivered to you on a regular basis.
Subscribe to our newsletter here!

Social Media

Stay in touch:
We look forward to a lively dialogue with you – using all the benefits offered by social media.
Visit the social media channels of MEDICA Trade Fair here

More about…

Image: Graphic of a brain; Copyright:

Imaging technique maps serotonin activity in living brains


Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that's partly responsible for feelings of happiness and for mood regulation in humans. This makes it a common target for antidepressants, which block serotonin from being reabsorbed by neurons after it has dispatched its signal, so more of it stays floating around the brain.
Read more
Photo:  image of a sealed glass cell; Copyright: University of Virginia

Scientists create novel imaging technique with potential for medical diagnostics


A new imaging method, called "polarized nuclear imaging" - combining aspects of both magnetic resonance imaging and gamma-ray imaging - has potential for new types of high-resolution medical diagnostics as well as industrial and physics research applications.
Read more
Image: multiple coordinated views of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI; Copyright: Sugeerth Murugesan, Berkeley Lab/UC Davis

Brain modulyzer provides interactive window into the brain


New Berkeley Lab tool could shed light on how neurological diseases spread.
Read more
Image: Open surgery at the forearm of a patient; Copyright: Sitthisombat

Hemodialysis: Creating the AV fistula using catheters


For many patients, the start of hemodialysis marks the lifelong dependency on needing their blood purified. But before they can actually begin treatments, a blood vessel in the patient's arm needs to be enlarged to where it can move enough blood and withstand being connected to the dialysis machine several times per week.
Read more
Image: Hybrid OR; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Hybrid Operating Room: The OR of the Future Today?


Patients take center stage during surgery. Their treatment should be as gentle and effective as possible, which is why there is a trend towards minimally invasive surgery (MIS). But minimal procedures require better supporting technologies. The hybrid operating room combines surgery and imaging systems and increasingly replaces conventional open surgery approaches with MIS.
Read more
Image: surgery Copyright: Klinikum Weiden/private

Intraoperative imaging – added benefit or high-tech gadget?


Monitoring individual results during surgery with an angiography system? This is already an option in approximately 200 hospitals in Germany. Thanks to intraoperative imaging, major medical procedures can be replaced by minimally invasive surgery because physicians are able to monitor the results immediately. This is gentler on patients and decreases the number of subsequent revision surgeries.
Read more
Image: OR with modern equipment, large screens and lamps; Copyright: Erwin Keeve, Charité

OR of the future: technology benefits surgeons


When it comes to the future of medicine, we often ponder how we would like to be treated. On the other hand, there is the issue of how physicians would like to treat their patients. The surgical procedures are determined by the technology that doctors are surrounded by. That’s why technology development also needs to be adapted to the needs of surgeons in the operating room of the future.
Read more
Image: girl in the MRI, physican besides; Copyright: Klinikum Dortmund/Dr. Lindel

MRI scan: Video projections help children overcome their fear


A beautiful field of flowers, a trip to the beach or a visit to the zoo. Children can experience all of these at the Clinical Center Dortmund in a 270- degree projection on the wall. The Center created a space that is designed to help its little patients overcome their fear of MRI scans.
Read more
Image: Migrating pioneer neurons under the phase contrast microscope, selectively stained by a fluorescence dye; Copyright: TiHo

Novel test method to replace animal testing


Testing the impact of chemo toxicity on the human development without having to resort to animal testing: To get closer to this goal, the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation (TiHo) and the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) are developing a new in-situ test method to examine the hazardous potential of chemical substances.
Read more
Image: Four coloured images of tissue with variations of red, green, yellow and orange; Copyright: Tzoumas/TUM

Non-invasive imaging method for showing oxygen in tissue


Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue.
Read more
Photo: Three men pose during an award ceremony

Cardiac insufficiency: early diagnosis with ultrasound


Heart failure or cardiac insufficiency presents an extra strain on patients because it severally limits everyday performance and deprives them of energy. Due to their intense need for movement, children are particularly strongly affected. However, the disease is frequently not detected until the physical performance is already declining. An early diagnosis could prevent this.
Read more
Photo: Male nurse slides an incubator into the MRI; Copyright: LMT Medical Systems GmbH

An incubator suitable for MRI scans


Every little thing can be a matter of life or death for premature babies. That is why the right diagnosis plays an extremely important role. This includes examining infants with an MRI scan. Until now, sliding premature babies into an MRI scanner without an incubator was only possible to a limited degree. Now this problem could be solved.
Read more
Photo: Three-dimensional model of the right ventricle

Ultrasound: four dimensions for pediatric cardiac diagnostics


Fortunately, only a handful of newborns are affected by them, though this determines if not the rest of their lives then, at least, the first few years of affected children: congenital heart defects. After the necessary surgeries, the small patients repeatedly need to return for checkups. Until now, these were conducted using MRI scans. 4D ultrasound can be an alternative.
Read more
Photo: Smiling man - Sven Seifert

A new world: hybrid operating room workstation


Performing surgery in a hybrid operating room is meant to be a relief for the staff and offer patients new options for treatment. What is actually so different about this hybrid operating room, what can you expect and what should you keep in mind during the planning process?
Read more

Fighting myomas with ultrasound


A proper diagnosis is a part of great therapy. However, it can also be beneficial to be able to quickly respond to changes during a treatment. One example of this is the treatment of uterine myomas. Female patients at the University Hospital Bonn are treated using so-called high-intensity focused ultrasound, HIFU in short. Prof. Holger Strunk explains this procedure.
Read more

Theranostics: Complex particles for tomorrow's medicine


It is a portmanteau, a mixture of two words. This way it saves us time and trouble while speaking because the human speech apparatus is lazy. And it describes a mixture of procedures: the combination of two procedures that would normally be separate in medicine. We are talking about theranostics.
Read more

Small companions: How wearables change our lives


They can be seen everywhere: at the wrists, in the ear, clipped to the belt. Wearables are small technical assistants who are built to collect and partially also to analyze data. Some of them collect measurable health data, others "only" count their user’s steps or measure the surrounding UV radiation. The fact is, however, that wearables are en vogue and are used for many different cases.
Read more

Fast and low radiation exposure: The newest generation gamma camera


Nuclear medicine physicians use so-called gamma cameras for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The devices record radioactive substances that are injected into the patient and show changes in the heart muscle (myocardium). Now a new gamma camera is able to record images faster and by using much less radiation.
Read more

Prostate cancer: Agent with theranostic potential


Endoradiotherapy can be very unpleasant for cancer patients, since it does not only harm tumor cells, but also healthy ones. Sometimes, patients even need to stop therapy because of the side effects. Physicians and researchers are thus continuously searching for ways to transport radiopharmaceuticals directly and exclusively to their target.
Read more

Radiopharmaceuticals: Individualized diagnostics and therapy


Malignant tumors can be fought with X-rays – usually with radiation therapy from outside the body. Nuclear medicine physicians can also accomplish this inside the body with radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals. They also offer big benefits for clinical diagnostics as long as a specific target can be assigned to them.
Read more
Photo: Image with red luminous bladder, next cystoscope

Making the invisible visible with fluorescence


Bladder tumors have different growth characteristics. In most cases, they are limited to the inner wall of the bladder and thus well resectable. Unlike carcinoma in situ, which becomes muscle invasive after a certain amount of time. To be able to completely remove the tumor during resection, photodynamic diagnostics (PDD) can make sense.
Read more

Early cancer detection: "Physicians and patients need a good database"


Whether it is a mammogram, colonoscopy or a skin cancer screening – after a certain age, we are subject to various early cancer detection screenings. Yet many of us don’t know that these screening tests are also associated with risks. This is something what Dr. Sylvia Sänger from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf discovered in a study.
Read more
Photo: Application of the NanoKnife therapy

Prostate cancer: gentle removal with irreversible electroporation


The NanoKnife® therapy practiced at the Prostate Center in Offenbach am Main removes prostate tumors in a gentle manner im comparison to prostatectomy or radiation therapy. In this interview with, Professor Michael K. Stehling explains the advantages of the focal therapy.
Read more
Photo: Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt

Laboratory in Space: Hot on the Trails of Cartilage Degradation


On November 10, 2014, astronaut Alexander Gerst will return to Earth from the International Space Station (ISS). He is not just anxiously expected by his family, but also by Dr. Anna-Maria Liphardt from the Institute of Biomechanics and Orthopedics at the German Sport University Cologne
Read more
Photo: Spinal disc stress simulator

Spinal disc herniation: causal research with the simulator


Herniated discs can have very different effects: some cause no discomfort and are only discovered by accident; others can cause paralysis or cause patients to be in great pain. For the most part, these problems develop suddenly after an awkward movement – at least that is what patients report.
Read more
Photo: Nanodiamond

Nanodiamonds: "Our goal is not to be able to diagnose a specific disease, but to offer medicine a universal tool"


They are not just “a girl's best friend“, but are also important helpers in medicine: diamonds. Yet the latter are so tiny that they are not visible to the naked eye. Dr. Patrick Happel at the Ruhr University Bochum in Germany studies so-called nanodiamonds. Someday soon, they are supposed to help in significantly improving medical imaging.
Read more
Photo: Modern OR at the Charité

OR technology: developing more flexibility and usability


Gentle, safe, precise, fast – surgical interventions need to meet many demands: laws and regulations concerning safety, the desire for the best possible health outcome, economic requirements of hospitals and ever-changing technology make up today’s framework for surgery. As a consequence, operating theaters and the way they are equipped change, too.
Read more

Football: "We want to globally determine deaths for the first time"


Sudden deaths of football players make headlines time after time: competitive athletes who are the idols of many people die just when they are on the playing field and in the limelight. Congenital heart defects often cause their death. Sports physicians and FIFA now plan to ascertain data that can help improve preventive examinations in competitive football.
Read more

Sonography: "Unfortunately, hospitals are not being required to train well"


Prenatal care, cancer check-up, vascular examinations – sonography is versatile, provides reliable imaging to physicians and does not tax patients with radiation. It is comprehensively available, from doctor’s office to university medical center. A sound continuing education of sonography users is essential for good diagnostics, also since different devices have different strong points.
Read more
Photo: Researcher in the lab

"An MRI device the size of two to three shoeboxes could soon sit on your desk"


Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established procedure in clinical diagnostics. It creates a signal with millions of nuclear spins, which in turn is converted into images. Very large magnets are being used to align the nuclear spins. Researchers at the University Medical Center Freiburg study a new method that can do without expensive magnets.
Read more

"We don’t know why certain pharmaceuticals bind especially well while others bind barely at all"


Prof. Joachim Heberle from the Free University of Berlin wants to make the smallest protein structures visible under the microscope. He wants to accomplish this with an infrared microscope, originating in the field of physics. He told which technology is behind all this and what he also wants to examine with it in the future.
Read more

KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment


Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
Read more

Radiology and technology: "Numerous phantom studies have been conducted that prove the advantages of this new CT system"


Radiologists usually do their work after oncologists when it comes to cancer treatment. Yet modern radiology also provides treatments at this point. spoke with Professor Stefan Schönberg, Director of the Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at the University Medical Center Mannheim, Germany, about the use of a new computer tomograph and its benefits for patients.
Read more

"The Virus Manipulates the Host Cell on Different Levels"


Heart diseases can be triggered by special viruses that affect the cardiac muscle. Preventive drugs could definitely be developed – if the virus does not mutate.
Read more